Results of the Research - 

"Behaviour Procedures of Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Feeding Problems in Home Setting"


Written on 09 September 2016 by

Sibel Gur MSc ABA

ABA Consultant


The mean percentage of sessions in which the participant engaged in food acceptance, expulsion and disruption during baseline and intervention was calculated for meat, fruit, vegetables and starch.

The mean number of spoons (quantity consumed) was also calculated for each food. The participant’s acceptance remained low for fruit and starch, and expulsion and disruption remained high in both food groups in the first baseline condition.

Acceptance increased, on the other hand expulsion and disruption decreased for fruit and starch during the first treatment when escape extinction procedures were applied. Removal of escape extinction in the second baseline condition resulted in decrease noticeably in acceptance of fruit and starch. For fruit significant increase noted in expulsion and for starch the level of expulsion almost remained similar during the second baseline condition. For fruits, the level of disruption showed small discrepancies in the second baseline condition and for starch it decreased.

Reimplementation of escape extinction in the second treatment condition produced increase in acceptance and decreases in disruptive behaviour for fruit and starch. Expulsion notably decreased for fruit and remained unchanged for starch.

The participant’s acceptance appeared to be more consistent and high for meat and vegetables during the first baseline condition in which there were no expulsions for meat and vegetables. However disruption was low for meat and appeared to be high for vegetables.

When the first treatment of escape extinction procedure was introduced for meat and vegetables disruption increased for meat and decreased for vegetables. On the other hand, acceptance increased prominently for meat and vegetables.

Removal of escape extinction in the second baseline condition resulted in decreases in acceptance and disruption. Expulsion also decreased for meat but increased for vegetables. Reimplementation of escape extinction in the second treatment condition produced remarkable increases in acceptance and significant decreases in disruptive behaviour for meat and vegetables. There were no expulsion for meat but it decreased for vegetables. In terms of the quantity of food, Implementation of escape extinction in the first and second treatment conditions resulted in increases in the quantity of food consumed for each food.

Limitations of the Research - 

"Behaviour Procedures of Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Feeding Problems in Home Setting"


Written on 08 August 2016 by

Sybil Gur MSc ABA

ABA Consultant


A major limitation facing this study is the fact that it is challenging to conduct follow-ups because of the time restrictions associated with conducting MSc dissertations. Without persistent treatment, improvements may fail to be recognised. Consequently, as parents may fail to be adequately trained, it may be inaccurate to generalize feeding and maintenance efforts (Schreibman, 2000).

The current study did not assess the time that the researcher used to train parents. Focus was not on training parents as it was on data collection. Without training the teachers, limit success can be achieved as they lacked the skills to maintain the desired feeding behaviours. It would have been more effective if the parents were trained appropriately, it would have been possible to have successful interventions to food selectivity problems at home.

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